Summer’s End

Tomorrow, Monday September 23rd, is the first day of fall. Specifically, the 2019 fall equinox will begin at 3:50 a.m Eastern Standard Time on that morning. We tend to think the season starts September 20th or 21st, but the date varies. It ranges from Sept. 21 to Sept. 24.

Aside from this, I’m still trying to figure out where summer went. While I sulk over its all-too-brief appearance on my patch of the planet this year, I’m wistfully sharing this snap taken from my back deck on one of our loveliest summer days, August 4th.

While everyone else seems to have embraced fall and are busy with their updated plans and schedules, I’m here wishing I could turn back the calendar. 🌞 🌞 🌞

Sunday Snaps: Abstracts in Seasonal Photography*

*Hi, everyone! I’m resharing a popular post from three years ago and have closed comments. My apologies – I’m away but will return next week with something new. – JKP

***

Designing abstract images from nature photography can be creative fun. When you play around with your photos to highlight shape, colour, texture, etc., you can come up with some interesting captures.

In this post, I share images from the four seasons.
All but one were taken here in Newfoundland.

Winter in Newtown

Cold Atlantic off Perrys Point, Newtown, NL
Cold Atlantic Ocean off Perry’s Point
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Sleet on Grass with Ice Fog 
Funnel Cloud 

Spring

Iceberg, Greenspond, NL
Iceberg in Greenspond, NL
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Spring Thaw, Newtown, NL
Spring Thaw in Newtown

Summer

Groundcover in Woods, Kilmory, NL
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Lead Cove Bank, NL
Thunderclouds, Newtown, NL
Thunderclouds over Newtown
Evergreens, Garden Cove, NL
Evergreen Branches in Garden Cove, NL

Autumn in Newtown

Granite on Perry's Point, Newtown, NL
Granite and Lichen on Perry’s Point
Partridgeberries on the Point
Partridgeberries 
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Wet Sand
Mackerel Sky, Newtown, NL
Mackerel Sky in Newtown

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”
~ Albert Einstein

Originally published here.

Evening Sky in Autumn

Autumn sky“There is a harmony in autumn, and a luster in its sky.”
– Percy Bysshe Shelley

West Coast Road Trip

Earlier this month, husband Paul announced plans for a quick business trip to Port aux Basques on our province’s west coast. It had been far too long since my last visit there, so faster than you can say “riding shotgun,” I had a bag packed and my camera ready.
Fall has got to be the most colourful time to drive across the island.
As usual, I took far too many pictures,
but managed to sift and cull them down to what you see here.

Mountains loom in the distance.
The Codroy Valley is a glacial valley in the Anguille Mountains,
a sub-range of the Long Range Mountains.
It is “a lush haven for birders, nature lovers, and adventurers alike.”

Marble Mountain Ski Resort waits for snow.

Port aux Basques:

Marine Atlantic Gulf Ferry
Hotel Port aux Basques, our home for one night

Corner Brook:

The long drive back.

We opted to stay somewhere for the
second night to break up the trip.

The trees were just as vibrant from
Springdale to King’s Point, where we stayed.
We knew the inn was nice from our overnight there two years ago.

 I hope you enjoyed these scenes from our fall road trip.

*Photos taken with Canon EOS REBEL T3 and iPhone 6

Autumn Walk on the East Coast

I shared this post exactly five years ago this week. I thought its photos deserved another look. Have a great weekend, everyone! ❤
Due to time constraints, comments are closed.

Come along as we take a stroll through Newtown on this beautiful October day.

partridgeberries – a.k.a. lingonberries

The tide is high this afternoon.

Much of my next door neighbour’s garden is still summer lovely.



I stopped to admire another neighbour’s potato harvest. Of course, he insisted I take a bagful.

Dogberries, a true harbinger of Fall


Lobster traps

Mr. Blue Sky and me

Still wearing his shorts in October, and loving it

The Tickle




Our other neighbour is drying salt fish.

Freshly painted grapnels for next year’s fishing season

Kitties, you should have come with us.

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Getaway to Twillingate – Part Two

Yesterday’s forecast had been accurate. We woke up to a brilliantly sunny morning, though it was a little on the chilly side.

After breakfast, I zipped up my hoodie, grabbed my camera and took a stroll around the area we were staying. Won’t you come along with me?

This theatre is busy all summer long.

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 Plenty of B&B's, cottages and inns in Twillingate, mostly deserted in the off-season.
Plenty of B&B’s, cottages and inns in Twillingate, mostly deserted in the off-season.

As usual, I couldn’t resist the pull of the ocean, so I took a walk down along the coastline to get these last few shots:

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His work finished, for now, on the new winery, my guy is ready to go.
His work finished for now, my guy is ready to go as soon as I get back.

Maybe the next time we visit Twillingate, we’ll come in late spring during iceberg season.

Thanks for tagging along! I hope you enjoyed it. 🙂

A Seasonal Love Note

I know our Atlantic Canadian summers are short and I treasure the warmer days while they’re here, but there is something about this season of change I truly love as well.

Late summer and early fall has a uniquely different quality, where on a sunny day the air lends a crisper, more metallic edge to the natural world. (This love affair hinges on one important caveat: that the northeast wind doesn’t blow too much and turn our world chilly and wet for days on end.)

The outlines of clouds against the steel-blue sky look sharper, heralding the approach of what is to come. Most foliage and grasses are still summery green. I relish them all the more, knowing the colours will soon transition into vibrant shades of red and gold before finally fading to the cool grey and white hues of late autumn and winter.

It is a season of harvest and renewal, a time of new beginnings and the dawning of fresh ideas. The kiddies are back in their classes. Though my own school days and child rearing years are well behind me, I still feel that push of motivation into new plans and goals, to make the transition into a stricter work schedule, to get back to writing more in the coming months. November and NaNoWriMo are still a ways off, but I strive to clear up all loose ends in preparation for – dare I say it without jinxing myself – a 50 thousand-word first draft of a brand-spanking new novel.

Then there are the berries. Where would this season be without the berries?

fullsizerender-3fruits of the first trip

fullsizerender-2…and fruits of the second

In two afternoon jaunts, the blueberries are now picked, and it won’t be long before we are in on the barrens again to pick partridgeberries. (In other parts of the world, these lovely bitter, relatives of the cranberry are called lingonberries or cowberries.) I make plenty of the “patchy-berry” jam for my other half since he likes it on his morning toast all year round, not to mention in the occasional pastry tart with a generous dollop of thick cream.

Especially anticipated, besides an excursion on the barrens, is picking the plump, juicy partridgeberries that grow right here on our land. I checked all around the Point last week and it looks like a bumper crop this year, probably a sign of how plentiful their growth is everywhere else. They, along with the blueberries and the cod from the food fishery, will go a long way in keeping our deep freeze full for another winter.

Coinciding with the cool-down in temperature is a return to more bread-baking. There’s nothing like the smell of a fresh batch from the oven to take the chill out of your day.

“Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.”
– F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

What do you like the most about this time of year?
Relief from the heat? A return to a more orderly schedule?
Getting the children out from underfoot and back in school?
Or are you sad because the summer is nearly spent?
Do tell!

This post was inspired by Ailsa’s Travel Theme: Seasonal.

Abstracts in Seasonal Photography

Designing abstract images from nature photography can be creative fun. When you play around with your photos to highlight shape, colour, texture, etc., you can come up with some interesting captures.

In this post, I share images from the four seasons.
All but one were taken here in Newfoundland.

Winter in Newtown

Cold Atlantic off Perrys Point, Newtown, NL
Cold Atlantic Ocean off Perry’s Point
187
Sleet on Grass with Ice Fog 
Funnel Cloud 

Spring

Iceberg, Greenspond, NL
Iceberg in Greenspond, NL
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Spring Thaw, Newtown, NL
Spring Thaw in Newtown

Summer

Groundcover in Woods, Kilmory, NL
221
Lead Cove Bank, NL
Thunderclouds, Newtown, NL
Thunderclouds over Newtown
Evergreens, Garden Cove, NL
Evergreen Branches in Garden Cove, NL

Autumn in Newtown

Granite on Perry's Point, Newtown, NL
Granite and Lichen on Perry’s Point
Partridgeberries on the Point
Partridgeberries 
109
Wet Sand
Mackerel Sky, Newtown, NL
Mackerel Sky in Newtown

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”
~ Albert Einstein

So Long, Summer

Although the calendar tells me it is now officially fall, I am enchanted by these last few days of beautiful temperate weather we are enjoying in Newfoundland. Paul and I even had a chance to lie in the sun and read yesterday evening. It was so gorgeous on our deck that we didn’t want to go inside for supper until the sun sank low on the horizon.

As much as I love the summer temperatures, it’s nearly time to say good-bye.
Happily, I have a nostalgic affection for fall and everything it brings.

Here are a couple of pics I snapped of ripening apples
on our recent trip to Springdale in Green Bay:
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The view beyond the apple trees:

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We stayed overnight in nearby King’s Point.
Here is the view from our room the next morning:

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011

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King’s Point Pottery

Before leaving, I made sure to visit the pottery and craft store to browse and to buy a few things:
012If you ever get the opportunity to visit the area, do stop in here. You won’t be sorry.

One of the perks of my husband’s job is joining him on these road trips.
We love any opportunity to visit the many corners of our island.

***
Two evenings ago, I had to run for my camera again.
The sunset on Perry’s Point was so stunning,
I think Maisie and Vivian were even spellbound:
103
099
101
107After the sun disappeared, the sky took on a strikingly different quality:
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Another good-bye…
That same evening, I received a call from my sister.
My beloved aunt in the U.S. had passed away suddenly.

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I am inclined to let imagination take hold,
to fancy that as she went to join my dad (her brother),
she painted that sky as a farewell to her loved ones here at home.

Rest easy, Aunt Irene. All is well.