In the Ocean of Life

“In the ocean of life, we are all ships that pass in the night.”

 adapted from a poetic metaphor by
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Sunday Snaps: Abstracts in Seasonal Photography*

*Hi, everyone! I’m resharing a popular post from three years ago and have closed comments. My apologies – I’m away but will return next week with something new. – JKP

***

Designing abstract images from nature photography can be creative fun. When you play around with your photos to highlight shape, colour, texture, etc., you can come up with some interesting captures.

In this post, I share images from the four seasons.
All but one were taken here in Newfoundland.

Winter in Newtown

Cold Atlantic off Perrys Point, Newtown, NL
Cold Atlantic Ocean off Perry’s Point
187
Sleet on Grass with Ice Fog 
Funnel Cloud 

Spring

Iceberg, Greenspond, NL
Iceberg in Greenspond, NL
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Tuscan Vineyard and Olive Grove, Italy
Spring Thaw, Newtown, NL
Spring Thaw in Newtown

Summer

Groundcover in Woods, Kilmory, NL
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Lead Cove Bank, NL
Thunderclouds, Newtown, NL
Thunderclouds over Newtown
Evergreens, Garden Cove, NL
Evergreen Branches in Garden Cove, NL

Autumn in Newtown

Granite on Perry's Point, Newtown, NL
Granite and Lichen on Perry’s Point
Partridgeberries on the Point
Partridgeberries 
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Wet Sand
Mackerel Sky, Newtown, NL
Mackerel Sky in Newtown

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”
~ Albert Einstein

Originally published here.

While it is February

Perry’s Point – jenniferkellandperry.com

While it is February, one can taste the full joys of anticipation. Spring stands at the gate with her finger on the latch. ~ Patience Strong

Winifred Emma May (1907 – 1990) was a poet from the United Kingdom, best known for her work under the pen name Patience Strong. Her poems were usually short, simple and imbued with sentimentality, the beauty of nature and inner strength. – Wikipedia

When I found the above quote to accompany today’s photo, I couldn’t help but smile at the author’s pen name. “Patience Strong” is what some of us need to get through the cold and icy month of February. 🙂

Comments are closed.

Winter Afternoon

January 14, 2019

Winter afternoon
peace and quiet so serene
clear and cold and blue
– but I’m never blue with you
in our home beside the sea.

***

The Japanese tanka is a 31-syllable poem.
Tanka translates as ‘short song’ and is known for its 5-line, 5/7/5/7/7 syllable count form.

Wild Geese

Beloved poet Mary Oliver passed away on Thursday at the age of 83.  Oliver’s poems were much inspired by the link between the natural world and spirituality.

When I read her poem Wild Geese back in 2015, it stirred me to write about my feelings of belonging, or lack thereof, and of my own place in the world.

Having lived through a number of moves, changes, and upheavals, my transitions often deemed me as a newcomer who will probably always feel a little like someone on the outside, looking in.*

Yet, when I read that poem and let the words sink in, they seem to grant me the freedom to love and experience all the things that mean the most to me. I can now belong in this life I’ve created, just as everyone belongs to the bigger picture that is the universe, to bear witness to a journey filled with joy, sorrow, and exquisite beauty.*

Of course, Mary Oliver said it better than I ever could:

photo: jenniferkellandperry.com

*Excerpts from my blog post: Belonging, March 12, 2015.
Many of the comments on your own feelings of belonging were a real eye-opener for me!

What is “your place in the family of things”?

Frozen Time

Photography is the art of frozen time

“Photography is the art of frozen time …
the ability to store emotion and feelings within a frame.”

– Meshack Otieno

Newtown, NL

Photos were taken on the first of January while out for an afternoon walk.
Our faces felt frozen but our bodies stayed toasty warm.

Time to bundle up on those walks, my northern friends.
Happy New Year to all!

Sunday Snaps: Root Cellars of Elliston

Elliston, root cellar capital of the world

root cellars of Elliston, NL

These photos of root cellars are from one of my November posts five years ago. I’ve been thinking about them lately because in the speculative novel I’m writing, an abandoned root cellar figures largely in certain plot points of the story.

More than 130 root cellars have been documented in the Elliston area, dating back as far as 1839, and some are still used today to store homegrown vegetables.

According to Elliston folklore, the older folks told the children that babies came from root cellars. For more photos and info, click on the link below:

Mom, where do babies come from?

Sunday Snap: A New Perspective

Aerial View of Perry's Point
Aerial View of Perry’s Point

This cool photo of Perry’s Point was snapped last week on Monday, November 5th by Paul’s cousin, Winston Perry. He took it from a small plane and gave me permission to share. Check out the sand and the seaweed around the coastline.

That’s my house in the foreground, closest to the end of the point, the blue one with the shed and a little blue outhouse to the far left. A large portion of Newtown is shown in the background.

The sunshine that day makes the house colour look lighter from that angle, but if you click on my Facebook link below, you’ll see its true colour. Laundry and all! That photo was taken by Winston’s brother and our neighbour, Wayne Perry.

Thanks for the great captures, guys!

Home Sweet Home on Facebook

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Places People Live

Blogger Bouquet #54

I recently discovered Wandering Canadians travel and adventure blog and am now a follower.

Who are the Wandering Canadians?

“We’re a couple of Canadians who enjoy hiking, camping, cross-country skiing, diving, and spending as much time outdoors as we can. We hope our stories can help as you plan for your adventures. Thanks for reading.” –L & K

I was thrilled to come across their post from July where they describe their 10-day trip to the island portion of my own province, Newfoundland and Labrador.

The photography is stunning too. But please don’t take my word for it, click on the highlighted post below and see for yourself.

Newfoundland

Comments are closed here but you can leave a comment on the blogger’s page.

Have a beautiful weekend, everyone!

Mariners’ Memorial

I don’t know about you, but I find these fall photos I took in scenic Grand Bank as Halloween-ghostly as they are eye-catching.

The story behind this memorial is one of tragedy and loss, a familiar one for many who live on this island in the North Atlantic.

From the Town of Grand Bank’s website:

“This is the Mariners’ Memorial: a life-size female figure and a water and beach rocks “shoreline” containing the names of the mariners who were lost at sea. The woman represents and exemplifies the virtues and strength of character of thousands of Newfoundland wives, mothers, daughters, and sisters who had to endure the loss of their men. She is standing alone on the widow’s walk staring in the distance. Her body is full of tension, anticipation and premonition of tragedy. Like a withered tree, she remains there eternally expecting those who will never return.”

To see more of my photos from historic Grand Bank, NL, click here.