Sunday Snaps: Buoys of Summer

In a fishing village like Newtown, you will often see brightly-painted buoys adorning fences, rails and walls, particularly in summer.

While buoys of all types are still used for fishing. . .

. . . many are adapted solely for decoration.

As fall approaches, most of the buoys will be put away until next summer, but some embellish the landscape all year round.

buoysWhen creating the title for this post, I couldn’t help but be reminded of the Don Henley song, The Boys of Summer.

“I can tell you my love for you will still be strong
after the boys of summer have gone.”

Of course, if you are from anywhere besides the U.S., my play on words makes sense.
All other English-speaking countries pronounce buoy like “boy”, whereas most Americans pronounce it “boo-ee”. I wonder why.

And if that’s the case, how do Americans pronounce “buoyant” and “buoyancy”?

How do you pronounce buoy?
Do tell!

(And can you tell I’m not
ready for summer to end?)

Sunday Snaps: Skipper Alex

Alexander Perry

Alexander Perry, or Skipper Alex (aka Alec) as he was called by many, was my husband’s grandfather. For those that don’t already know, our home on Perry’s Point for the past ten years is the same home in which Alexander and his wife Mary Jane lived and raised their large family.

Alexander worked as a skipper  on a number of fishing schooners. He made many trips to Labrador to fish for cod, which he brought back to Newtown to be cured before it was carried by ship from St. John’s to England and sometimes Jamaica.

Although I never met the man, I’ve heard many good things about him.  Skipper Alex was widely admired for his seafaring abilities, his pleasant disposition and gentle spirit, and his flair for storytelling. Locals loved to visit with him—or he with them—to be regaled with colourful tales of his experiences. Of course, having a love of stories myself, I wish I could have known him back in the day.

Below is a letter from Pompano Beach, Florida that Paul found in a box in the attic when we renovated our house. It was written by John Maxwell Barbour, known as Max, the eldest son of Captain Alphaeus Barbour. I imagine the letter meant something to Alex for him to hold onto it like that. He would have been 81 when he received it, and Max, 69. I typed the letter out for easier reading.

Jan. 22, 1969

Dear Skipper Alex,

This carries to you and to your good wife my warm congratulations on your 56th wedding anniversary.

Seeing your excellent picture brought back many memories of my boyhood days in Newtown and of our many contacts, all of which were pleasant and helpful in shaping me for the years ahead. To put it quite plainly, during that period you were one of my favourite adults and without question your personality made a good impression on me.

To my mind’s ear the sound of the guns fired at your wedding still comes thru. I recall the happy occasion well altho I was not old enough then to be a guest.

My wife joins me in sending you and your wife best wishes for continued health and happiness.

Very sincerely,
Max Barbour.

Many thanks to Lester Barbour for giving me some background on Max.

“Granda” Perry on the Point – b. 1888 – d. 1977

Sunday Snap: Focus

Pic and a Word Challenge: Depth of Field

While my latest book is on submission, I’ve recently shifted my focus to photography (see what I did there? 😉 ). I’m starting an online course this week to study what my Canon camera can actually do beyond my usual point and click.

What is Depth of Field?
“Depth of field is the distance between the closest and farthest objects in a photo that appears acceptably sharp. Now your camera can only focus sharply at one point. But the transition from sharp to un-sharp is gradual, and the term ‘acceptably sharp’ is a loose one! Without getting too technical, how you will be viewing the image, and at what size you will be looking at it are factors that contribute to how acceptably sharp an image is.”  ~ photographylife.com

My humble contribution: I captured the above photo when my daughter and her family came to visit. My grandson took a shine to this gorgeous little caterpillar we found near Cape Freels beach.

Speaking of online courses, I’ve also signed up for a free course through the University of Alberta called Indigenous Canada, which includes 12 lessons that explore Indigenous histories and contemporary issues from an Indigenous perspective. The course is also accessible outside of Canada. For more info, click here.

Never curb your lifelong desire to learn, my friends. Focus on something new, to you! 🙂

Vivian’s View From Here: “They say it’s my birthday”

Hello, my peeps! Apparently it’s my 13th birthday today, so I guess I have cause to celebrate.

Me when I was a baby
Me today

I was feeling down and lonely because this birthday marks my first trip around the sun without my sweet sister Maisie. The good news though, is that I had a special visitor!

Archie

No no no—not that dog, Archie, who came here with his family this week. I’m glad he’s gone home.

I had a very unexpected visitor to Perry’s Point this weekend: a seal!

We usually see seals around here during the winter or spring, not in August. I wonder did he get lost? I hope not. In any case, his arrival caused a bit of a stir and had everyone running for their phones and cameras, including our neighbour Wayne. Here are a couple he captured with his camera.

Isn’t he pretty?

Not as pretty as me, of course.

I wish one and all a lovely Sunday
and hope you’ll celebrate with me!
♥ ♥ ♥

Sunday Snap: E-Book or Printed Book?

Do you prefer an e-reader or a physical book?
Clearly, Vivian prefers the real deal to my Kindle.

Besides its compact size, I love my Kindle for several obvious reasons: it has a built-in dictionary, translator, highlighter, and a light when I need it. I can refer to Wikipedia, browse the web, and shop for books on Amazon. I can transfer my own files to my Kindle and read them. I can enlarge the text if I want. And, of course, e-books are easily accessible and usually cheaper.  With libraries closed and less access to physical books during the pandemic, my e-reader has been a godsend, to say the least.

In spite of the benefits of an e-reader, I do love the feel of a real book in my hands. When all is said and done, it is my preference. Some studies point to the fact that we better retain what we read from a printed book. And then there’s the colourful cover art!

How about you? Do you like one more than the other? I can hear some of you now: “Jennifer, the main thing is to read, no matter how you do it.”

Exactly.

“The story is truly finished—and meaning is made—not when the author adds the last period, but when the reader enters.” ~ Celeste Ng

Sunday Snap: Puzzling

Wolves in Spring

I finished my pandemic puzzle this morning. Now I’m sad because I don’t have another one to start. Although puzzles may be considered a huge time-suck, I love them as a way to unwind. Jigsaw and crossword are my favourites, but like good books, I hate when I reach the end.

Speaking of puzzles, I learned two new words today:

  • Enigmatology: the science of puzzles
  • Cruciverbalist: a person skillful in creating or solving crossword puzzles

“It is one of man’s curious idiosyncrasies to create difficulties for the pleasure of resolving them.” – Joseph de Maistre

Summer Evening

Close of hot June day—
soft sea breeze, high crescent moon,
cool waves kiss the shore.

We’ve enjoyed a bit of a heat wave this past week, an unusually early occurrence here in the easternmost province of Canada.

I call it a bonus because our summers are notoriously short, and after a long winter and spring, warm sun-filled days are more than welcome. I’m also grateful for the coastal breezes that keep things temperate.

This is my contribution to A Photo a Week Challenge: Dusk – nancy merrill photography

My Girl*

momsday5
my girl and me
mother’s day weekend 2013

Today, June 14th,

is my girl’s birthday.

Since the first moment I held her

and gazed into her eyes

when I was just eighteen,

she’s been as constant in my life as the stars.

I wonder if she realizes

how much she has enriched my life,

how proud I am of her and

how happy I am to be her mom, because

she is more than a daughter to me.

She is my friend.

  Happy Birthday,

 **  Denise  **

“A daughter is one of the most beautiful gifts this world has to give.” ~ Laurel Atherton

 

*This is one of my evergreen posts, first published here in 2013.

Smile

Sunday Snaps: Vivian in Oblivion

Hey, everyone! Vivian K. Perry here, totally oblivious to this thing called a pandemic.

I’m been using Maisie as a comfy, cushy pillow lately. My sister would never have let me take such liberties before, but then, she hasn’t been herself these past few weeks.

Our vet at Gander Veterinary Clinic says Maisie has an overactive thyroid, so she’s now on medicine for that. Jennifer applies it twice a day by rubbing it on the inside of her ear flap.

Unfortunately, her hyperthyroidism is not typical. Maisie has become anorectic, and without the appetite stimulant medication, she simply won’t eat.

Of course, I was the first one to notice something was wrong. I could never be oblivious to that! I’ve been doing my part by cuddling with her and keeping her warm.

I’m trying not to worry but it’s hard.

Please keep little Maisie in your thoughts, my friends.