Perry Boys – a Look Back

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, I’m having trouble concentrating long enough to compose an original post. So today I’ll share a post from exactly five years ago, a nostalgic look back to simpler times.

When my husband Paul was six years old, he and his family moved from Newtown – the little community in which we live now – to live in the capital city of St. John’s. Their parents relocated so that Paul’s oldest sibling David could attend the Vera Perlin school for his special needs.
On the day of the big move, Paul crawled up under the house – the actual house we live in now – in a show of protest. “Everyone should be able to live where they were born,” he argued through tears, but the die had been cast. He was pulled out and packed into the car with everyone else.

100_0534

On the very first day at their new school, Paul and his other brother Kevin, who is one year older, decided to walk home from school for lunch, despite being told to stay there and eat the lunch they’d brought. But when they saw other children going home, they wanted to go as well. Unfamiliar with their new neighbourhood, the two boys got lost, and Kevin started to cry.

Brave little Paul tried his best to console his big brother by distracting him. “Don’t cry, Kev. Look at the pigeons,” he said, pointing at a bunch of them as they waddled across the sidewalk, hoping the strange, tame city birds might cheer him up. It worked, and they ended up following a classmate to his house. Between the jigs and the reels, their dad had to leave work and go pick them up.

Let’s go back a couple of years when Paul was four and Kevin was five, to another time the younger boy displayed his wisdom. A new addition to the family of three boys had arrived, and this time, it was a girl! When their mom brought baby Julie Ann home, the boys crowded around to get a look at their new sister. Kevin’s eyes opened wide when her diaper came off to be changed. “Look, Paul,” he said, incredulous. “She ain’t got nar topper!” (penis)
“No, ya foolish,” Paul said, enlightened beyond his years. “She got whatever Mom got.”

Now before you think I’m beating up on my brother-in-law, I’d like to share one more tale. Okay, two. When Paul was about nine and enjoying his summer vacation in Newtown, Kevin saved him from drowning. Paul was diving with some other boys off of Burnt Island, but he tired in the deep water and panicked. Kevin grabbed him by the hair on top of his head and pulled him to safety.

newtown

Years later, when Kevin was just beginning his teaching career, he and Paul were driving along in St. John’s one evening. Without warning, Kevin pulled over, stopped the car, and jumped out. He’d spied two teenage boys in a fist fight near the local hockey rink, and he wanted to stop them. Paul watched as he parted the boys, reasoned with them, and ended the scuffle.

It was a day he never forgot. Where most people would just keep going and not get involved, Kevin stepped in and tried to solve the problem. It made Paul really proud of his brother.

Paul confessed there were other boyhood fights where Kev stepped in and rescued Paul himself, fights my husband started and couldn’t finish. I would say he’s grateful for those too. And so am I. 🙂

L to R: David, Paul, Julie, and Kevin
L to R: David, Paul, Julie, and Kevin
Thirteen-year-old Paul

Originally posted on March 24, 2015 here.

24 thoughts on “Perry Boys – a Look Back

  1. This is a marvelous story of brothers who are kindred spirits. Thank you so much for sharing this story, Jennifer. I believe that writing about our personal stories is essential. For if we don’t tell our story, who will? Have a wonderful day. Sunshine on our side of Canada. My creative project is looking back on public domain poetry and find poets I never heard about before. And then reciting them out loud to an empty room with great enthusiasm!!!

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Hi Jennifer – we are although we’ve had to make many substitutions. Not much chicken or other fresh meats in the stores – just the things you wouldn’t usually want. I could buy a big T-Bone steak if I wanted to! And no ibuprofin or Tylenol, or pasta, rice, flour, sugar, etc. We’re well supplied with things, though and we have enough paper products for now. Otherwise good and everyone out there in the stores is very respectful.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. That’s good, but I hope your stores are soon restocked. Those are some important items! We will have to venture out later this week to replenish a few things, and I don’t really know what to expect. Making a batch of bread today. 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

          1. I think it’s going to be okay regarding supplies, but we are going to have to be open to new foods and products. My husband tried to order Tyelnol online (I’m hearing that’s best if you get the virus) but they’re sold out. Homemade bread sounds good – I may make muffins tomorrow morning 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

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